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Because we’re busy making soap, our factory location is open by appointment only for local pickup.

Only a few countries left that allow whaling
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Only a few countries left that allow whaling

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"There is no humane way to kill a whale, and they are forced to die a slow and painful death."  (http://savedolphins.eii.org/news/entry/the-truth-about-whaling
  
 
There are still four countries in the world that allow commercial whaling: Iceland, Norway, and Japan. The Faroe Islands, owned by Denmark, also still hunt whales and dolphins. Japan withdrew from the IWC in 2018 in order to resume commercial whaling this year. 
But there is some good news > the only two whaling companies in Iceland decided not to hunt whales this past summer 2019 for the first time in 17 years. The reasons they say are lack of boat preparation, and a larger no-fishing coastal zone, but it appears that the collapse of demand may be the real reason. News posts tell us that whaling in Iceland is actually a money losing proposition. Either way, this is great news.

In 1982, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) agreed to stop all commercial whaling by 1986. Unlike other whaling nations, Iceland did not take out an ‘objection’, but once the ban was in place, continued a small “scientific whaling” program, hunting a few dozen whales each year until 1989. It left the IWC, abruptly, in 1992.​

"Whaling is neither humane nor economically lucrative — yet Japan's Prime Minister Shinzō Abe is resurrecting the practice as a symbol of nationalism." https://www.newstatesman.com/world/asia/2019/07/why-japan-reviving-cruel-practice-whale-hunting-after-31-years

​In Iceland, whalers hunt endangered fin whales a​nd ​minke whales, yet whale meat is not even a traditional food in there.​​ Most of it is exported to Japan, with a small amount served to tourists.​ Fortunately global demand for whale meat has plummeted, to the point that whalers are using it for dog treats, iron supplements and even a so-called flavoring for beer​.​

Just for clarification, "commercial whaling was banned by the International Whaling Commission (IWC) in 1986, making an exemption for indigenous whaling for subsistence." https://nordicwanders.com/blog/2018/10/whaling-in-the-nordic-countries

 

Sources: 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7255999/Iceland-not-hunt-whales-summer-time-17-years.html

https://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2018/07/23/the-last-whaler-why-is-whaling-in-iceland-still-a-thing/

https://www.phys.org/news/2019-06-iceland-whaling-year-company.amp

https://www.newsweek.com/whaling-iceland-ban-1449517

https://iwc.int/home

https://www.hsi.org/issues/whaling/

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/kbxv7m/whale-meat-is-a-tough-sell-in-norway

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/alarming-facts-about-whaling/

https://www.projectjonah.org.nz/Take+Action/Whaling.html

https://awionline.org/content/whaling